10 types of pine trees everyone should know | American Coniferous Society (2023)

What is a pine?

Most of us refer to all conifers as pines, which is reasonable considering that the pine family (Pinaceae) is the largest conifer family, accounting for about a quarter of all trees with cones (the definition of a conifer is a plant). carrying pine cones). However, these around 200 species of the Pinaceae include not only pines, but also spruce, spruce, cedar, spruce and larch. Most Christmas trees sold in this country are spruce or spruce, although they are often referred to as pine. To truly be a pine, a conifer must belong to the genusPino.

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Scots pines quickly outgrow all but the grandest of gardens, as illustrated insugar pinedemonstrated, although it is among the approximately 100 species recognized in the genuspinoThere are many trees with attractive properties. The key to successful pine gardening is choosing from thousands of dwarf pine varieties. A cultivar, short for "cultivated variety," represents a selection chosen for its slower growth rate, dwarf shape, unusual color, pendulous habit, etc. In the world of varieties you will find attractive, hardy, interesting and textural options to enhance the beauty of your garden all year round.

10 of the best pines for gardens and one to avoid

1.pinus densiflora'low brightness'

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Low gloss Japanese red pine(USDA Zone 5) has a spreading habit, lush green needles and reddish textured bark when mature. Slow growing and well-behaved, it requires little pruning or special care. The specimen above is trimmed periodically to open the canopy and reveal part of the trunk and branches, but this is not necessary as the photo and link show.

2.Bergkiefer(Mountain Pine or Mugo Pine) Sorten

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The ACS recognizes about 80 cultivars of this species, commonly called mugo pine (pronounced "moo-go," not "mew-go") or mountain pine (USDA Zone 3).Mugo pinesThey are probably the most commonly seen pines in traditional nurseries and large department stores, and are often found boring by hobbyists and hobbyists. Mugos are among the hardiest conifers there are. Native to the windswept mountains of Central Europe, they are used to surviving in a harsh environment. But beauty and drama also lurk in this highly variable and misunderstood species! lead to'Jakobsen' groaned in painAbove: Naturally develops interesting open architecture without the need for pruning to provide a textural focal point for the garden. Its deep green needles add richness and depth to the landscape. It's also a wonderful option for a container and works beautifully in a rock garden.

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There are also some golden Mugo pines"Swiss tourist",'Karsten'is an excellent low growth selection, as well'Sunshine'. Others, like 'Ambergold' or'Wintersonne'grow to become quite erect in habit.

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3.Parviflora-Kiefer(Japanese White Pine) Varieties

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HimJapanese white pines(USDA Zone 5) are graceful, shapely plants with soft, delicate needles that are often striped with white, blue, or gold. These strains also have some of the most impressive pollen cones in the conifer world. They are not as hardy as cups, but with good drainage and some afternoon shade in hot areas, they do well in the garden.'Fukuzumi', pictured above, has a naturally windswept habit and rich blue-green needles. This specimen has never been trimmed.

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'Tenysu Kazu', also known as 'Goldylocks' is a stunning selection with creamy golden new growth.

As if their fluffy needles and graceful growth weren't enough, Japanese white pines boast some of the most spectacular and attractive male (pollen) cones of any conifer. Look aroundPinus parviflora 'Clear':

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Ö'Bergmann':

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4.Pino Banksiana'Tio misty'

If heParviflora-KieferVarieties are among the most elegant pines,'Tio misty'clearly has to be one of the more ridiculous ones. this crop ofPino Banksiana(USDA Zone 2) is alternately twisted, weepy and upright and no two are alike.

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Pino Banksiana, or Jack Pines, grow more irregularly in the wild than many other pine species. "Uncle Fogy" turns out to be one of the wildest of them all, sometimes standing up for a while and then falling to the ground and then getting up again and again. One of the best strains for pruning and shaping, you can make your 'Uncle Fogy' unique to your family! Pines are hardy plants and, once established, require little water and maintenance. There are other attractive varieties of this species such as'manometer'j'Engel'.

5.Pinus Jeffreyi'Joppi' (Empilhar Joppi Jeffrey)

California has more native conifers than any other state, but many of them have few or no cultivars. Lucky for Coneheads, one of the favorite natives,Pinus Jeffreyi, (USDA Zone 8) has a beautiful, compact cultivar called'Sim'.

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While the wild species can reach 80-120 feet at maturity, 'Joppi' thrives very well in a garden. The specimen above has been in the ground for six years, was planted in a 20 gallon container and stands about 5 feet tall. The long, stiff needles contrast beautifully with the lighter foliage, and their strong structure adds an architectural element.

6.Pinus Strobus breeder

IfParviflora-Kiefer, Pinus Strobus oder orientalischer Pinus Blanco(USDA Zone 3), is a smooth five-needle pine and also has graceful characteristics. WhatBergkiefer, there are many options for cultivars, with a wide variety of habits, colors, and shapes. ACS recognizes over 100P. Blitzcultivars, making this species one of the most garden-friendly conifers. We will see two varieties here that differ greatly in size, growth habit and color.

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'cute blue', pictured above, lives up to its name with its bright green needles and furry demeanor. Left alone, like this one, it's attractive if a bit rebellious. If you like it quieter, you can cut back as you wish, as the plant, which does not form a leader, tolerates pruning well.

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However, my favoritepine lightningcultivate is'pendulum',that's sort of a bad cousin of 'Uncle Fogy', albeit more sophisticated. This strain is not for small gardens or anyone wanting a clean and tidy look. As a 'Blue Shag' it adapts well to the cut and can be tamed (or wilder!) if desired.

7. Pinus sylvestris (pino silvestre)sorts

If I had to pick my favorite type of pine, it would have to be Scotch Pine, rightpinus silvestre(USDA-Zone 3).I love the blue-green flat needles on most strains and their neat, compact habit.

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However, if you prefer golden foliage,pinus silvestrehe does that too!'Gold of Nisbet'is one of the best varieties of golden conifers of all kinds and like many othersSylvesterVarieties, has a neat habit and relatively slow growth. With adequate watering, this golden conifer does not burn in full sun, even in my zone 9b.

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There are dozens of Scots pine cultivars to choose from. Check it out and maybe like me, you will fall in love!

8.black pine'Oregon Green' (Austrian Pine Green Oregon)

Like the Mugos, Austrian pines (USDA Zone 4) are one of the classic "hard" Old World pines, earning their name for their relatively hard wood (although, to avoid confusion, all conifers are classified as "soft" in the lumber industry). are known to be wood") . '). They have stiff needles of a very deep green and often a graceful natural form. When pruned they make wonderful focal points. My favorite is one of the larger varieties, 'Oregon Green'.

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9.Pinus koraiensis(Korean Pine) 'Dragon Eye' or 'Oculus Draconis'

korean pensThey are robust (USDA Zone 3), durable and very good looking. Most have curling pins, often with spots.'dragon eye'It is an upright strain that takes up little space, making it suitable for small gardens.

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10Pinus wallichiana'Zebrina'

Although Zebrina is last on the listHimalaya-Kieferone of the best! All Himalayan pines have long, elegant needles, howeverAlgebrahe does this best by painting them with pale yellow streaks. Especially in the soft winter light, the landscape effect is impressive.

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These are 10 of the best pines for a garden landscape in my opinion. But I promised you in the beginning that I would give you one thing to avoid:Pinus thunbergii"Thunder" (USDA Zone 5). Why are its negative qualities so important to me that I feel the need to point them out here? why'Thunderhead'It has the deepest, richest green needles of any conifer and produces profuse white candles (new shoots) in spring that contrast dramatically with the foliage. It's almost impossible to resist. This strain is so sought after that it is now popping up everywhere, even in nurseries that have very few conifers to offer.

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So if it's so beautiful and dramatic, what's the problem? He's a tyrant! Most varieties grow slower than species. This one really tops it! If you do nothing, this cute little plant will quickly turn into a giant woolly bear. Of the original three I planted, I kept one and had an expert prune it vigorously twice a year. If you're aware of Thunderhead's shortcomings, plant with impunity, but I've seen more disappointment (and disgust) associated with this strain than any other, in part due to the presentation it receives at retail.

These are my favorite pens. which are yours! We'd love to hear!

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